Cotswolds Views 5 of the Best!

Gotta love those Cotswold Views!

Here (below) are my favourite five – all are included in the Travel Guide of my book
COTSWOLDS MEMOIR:
Discovering a Beautiful Region of Britain on a Quest to Buy a 17th Century Cottage.

Now available on Amazon in Paperback, Kindle and NEW! Audio Book. www.DizWhite.com

Best COTSWOLD VIEW from a MANOR HOUSE

SNOWSHILL MANOR, 
Broadway, Gloucestershire, WR12 7JU nationaltrust.org.uk

Gorgeous views across the Snowshill Lavender fields and surrounding rolling hills.
This National Trust property houses Charles Wade’s eclectic collection of craftsmanship from all over the world. Charming organic garden.

 

Best COTSWOLD VIEW from a COUNTRY INN

EDGEMOOR INN, Near Painswick, Gloucestershire, GL6 6ND edgemoor-inn.com

Breath-taking views from the terrace as inn overlooks entire Painswick valley and is situated on the Cotswold Way. Great food and beer. Close to Haresfield Beacon.

Best COTSWOLD VIEW from a CASTLE

WARWICK CASTLEWarwick, Warwickshire, CV34 4QU warwick-castle.com

Worth the climb up to the roof for unmatched views of  the River Avon, the Castle grounds, the Mill Garden and surrounding countryside.
1,000 years of history. Well constructed tableaux. Great Hall. State Rooms. Jousting. Trebuchet. Great day out with the kids. PeacockGarden. Gives Disney a run for its money.

 

Best COTSWOLD VIEW from a HISTORIC SITE

BROADWAY TOWER, Middle Hill, Broadway, Worcestershire, WR12 7LB broadwaytower.co.uk

View from Broadwat Tower

Completed in 1798 this folly was built for Lady Coventry on a beacon hill. Spectacular views of more than a dozen counties. Over 17 metres high. Open to the public.

 

Best COTSWOLD VIEW from a NATIONAL TRUST SITE

HARESFIELD BEACON, 3 miles north west of Stroud (see website for directions) gloucestershire.gov.uk

Haresfield Beacon 2

National Trust site on the Cotswold escarpment with amazing 360 degree views, some reaching as far as Wales. Site of a Roman-British hill fort.

 

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New! Cotswolds Memoir is now available as an AudioBook in addition to Paperback and Kindle

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A portion of the proceeds of every copy of  COTSWOLDS MEMOIR: is donated to Cotswold conservation institutions.

Cotswolds Ducks and National Trust Properties in the Cotswolds

   These adorable ducklings and their Mama Duck put on quite a show in the lily-bedecked canals of Westbury Court Gardens,  a National Trust property open to the public. I am having a wonderful time this glorious summer touring the Cotswolds, with my husband, via all the National Trust Properties in the Cotswolds.
I was handed a map of all their properties in this lovely region when I visited Chedworth Roman Villa and found it to be joy to visit them one by one – great way to see this area – taking me to parts of the Cotswolds I had never explored.
Westbury Court Garden near Gloucester and the Severn River on the edges of the Cotswolds was a revelation. It is the only 17th Century restored Dutch water garden in Great Britain.  It was originally laid out between 1696 and 1715 and remained untouched for over 300 years.
Hooray, for the National Trust rescuing it in 1967. An engraving from 1707 helped with the first complete garden restoration undertaken by this terrific organization.
Westbury Court Garden is a delight – it has a wealth of unusual plants, the calming trickle of water from the lily-covered canals, the oldest evergreen oak in England, ready for picking English apples,  plums, peaches and cherries espaliered and, in season, ripening against the old red-brick walls. There are Kingfishers, Heron, Sand Martins and of course those darling little ducklings.
We have almost worked our way through all the Cotswolds National Trust Properties making our membership fee a wonderful bargain and worth every penny.
We fairly quickly equaled the cost of our tickets in entrance fees and now it feels like all future visits and return visits are free.

NATIONAL TRUST PROPERTIES in the COTSWOLDS
So far we have visited Dyrham Park, Snowshill Manor and Garden, Newark Park, Lodge Park and Sherborne Estate, Upton House and Gardens, Woodchester Park, Minchinhampton and Rodborough Commons, Chedworth Roman Villa, Hidcote and Chasleton House.

More on all these with photos in upcoming blog posts:
Still to visit: Charlecote Park, Coughton Court, Croome Greyfriars’ House and Garden, Hanbury Hall and Gardens, Prior Park Landscape Garden, Stowe and Waddesdon Manor.

Downloadable Nation Trust app:
nationaltrust.org.uk/cotswolds
Tel: 0844 800 1895

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New! Cotswolds Memoir is now available as an AudioBook in addition to Paperback and Kindle

Click below to order
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A portion of the proceeds of every copy of  COTSWOLDS MEMOIR: is donated to Cotswold conservation institutions.

Gorgeous Cotswolds Private Manor House Gardens – How to see them

Rockcliffe Dovecote

I am always trying to peek over the walls of lovely gardens in the Cotswolds, especially those belonging to the large estates. I have only recently realized that I can actually see these fabulous gardens of the Manor House Estates of the Cotswolds by tracking down their open days on the National Garden Scheme.

Click on photos to enlarge

Campden House

Now I am over the moon – it’s raining gorgeous gardens. In the last couple of weeks I have toured Rockcliffe House Garden near Lower Swell, Eyford Garden near Upper Slaughter and Campden House Garden near Chipping Campden.

Rockcliffe Montage

Rockcliffe House and Gardens

The gardens offered glorious treasures such as: a parade of pleached lime trees lining a lovely lily pond, a whimsical Dove topiary climbing a hill to meet the real thing at its summit – a dovecot filled with cooing birds, ancient statuary half hidden in shrubbery, climbing courgettes begun in an impeccably kept greenhouse, a tennis court-sized croquet lawn, a jasmine filled orangery, alliums as big as footballs, and stunningly perfect herbaceous borders  among many other delights.

Eyford Montage 2

Eyford House and Gardens

This is a wonderful way for visitors to explore the Cotswolds and often meet the owners of these estates as my husband and I did at Eyford House. The very charming Charlotte Heber-Percy was selling tickets at the entrance to her estate and we struck up a conversation with her. As we chatted she decided to leave her ticket-selling duties to a helper and proceeded to walk us around her gorgeous garden taking us on a personally conducted tour. We couldn’t believe our luck as we strolled past the fox and hounds topiary listening in delight as she pointed out one spectacular garden feature after another. She also told us the history of her family and the manor house and garden. By the end of the tour it felt like we were old friends.

Topiary HoundAll photographs are by Randall Montgomery and are available for purchase at Publicitypromo@aol.com

Many of these gardens on these private estates are open only one day a year so it is a good idea to do some advanced planning. We got hold of a National Garden Scheme book that tells of every open garden for the year. It is as thick as a novel but is invaluable to have in the car. But also the info on the gardens is all online too. A trek around a couple of gorgeous estate gardens followed by tea and a bun (sometimes in a room in one of these ancient manor houses) is my idea of a perfect Cotswold day.

National Garden Scheme Website
www.ngs.org.uk

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New! Cotswolds Memoir is now available as an AudioBook in addition to Paperback and Kindle

Click below to order

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A portion of the proceeds of every copy of  COTSWOLDS MEMOIR: is donated to Cotswold conservation institutions.

Life is Just a Bowl of COTSWOLD Cherry Pie – Recipe and Lyrics 

Cherry pie for twitter

Life is Just a Bowl of (Cotswolds) Cherries………

It’s fresh cherry season in the Cotswolds right now so don’t miss out  – it doesn’t last long.
My husband Randall Montgomery who takes all the lovely photos in my book
Cotswolds Memoir
 (on Amazon) and on my web site makes just one pie a year – and he
waits for the Cotswolds cherries which are particularly juicy and flavourful.
Here’s the recipe for this delicious cherry pie.

Ingredients:

2 Pre-made Shortcrust Pastry Shells
2 lbs Freshly picked cherries (Cotswolds Cherries if possible)
2 tbls Brown Sugar
1 Egg-white beaten with a tsp of water

Method:

Pre-heat oven to 300 degrees F (150 C or gas mark 2)
Pit the Cherries, place in a saucepan sprinkle with Brown Sugar, stir,
cover and stew on low heat for 20 minutes stirring occasionally
While the cherry mixture is cooking,  roll out one Shortcrust Pastry Shell and place in 9″ pie pan
Prick the bottom of the shell with a fork and Bake for 20 Minutes

While the bottom shell is baking roll out the second Shortcrust Pastry to the thickness of a 10p coin and
with a pizza wheel or sharp knife cut the Pastry in 3/4″ strips 10″-12″ long

After baking, remove the first crust from the oven and use a slotted spoon to spoon the cherries into it
reserving the excess juice to use later (possibly as an ice cream topping)
(for decoration reserve one particularly large cherry to place on the top of the pie)
Now brush the egg mixture around the edge of the bottom crust and
use the strips of the second rolled out pastry to form a lattice work top as per this video below:

HOW TO WEAVE LATTICE PASTRY

Brush on more of the egg mixture, coating the top of the pie and sprinkle with Brown Sugar
Place in the oven and bake for an additional 30-40 minutes or until the pastry is golden brown

Life is Just a Bowl of Cherries

by Ray Henderson and lyrics by Buddy G. DeSylva and Lew Brown, published in 1931.
Ethel Merman introduced this song in George White’s Scandals of 1931.
Rudy Vallee‘s version, recorded it in 1931, stayed five weeks in the top 10 pop music charts.

Life is just a bowl of cherries
Don’t take it serious,
Life’s too mysterious
You work,
You save,
You worry so
But you can’t take your dough
When you go, go, go

So keep repeating “It’s the berries.”
The strongest oak must fall
The sweet things in life
To you were just loaned
So how can you lose
What you’ve never owned

Life is just a bowl of cherries
So live and laugh, aha!
Laugh and love
Live and laugh,
Laugh and love,
Live and laugh at it all!

Cotswolds Memoir_DizWhite

New! Cotswolds Memoir is now available as an AudioBook in addition to Paperback and Kindle

Click below to order
a.com_logo_RGB  

 

 amazon
A portion of the proceeds of every copy of  COTSWOLDS MEMOIR: is donated to Cotswold conservation institutions.

Life is Just a Bowl of COTSWOLD Cherry Pie – Recipe and Lyrics 

Cherry pie for twitter

Life is Just a Bowl of (Cotswolds) Cherries………

It’s fresh cherry season in the Cotswolds right now so don’t miss out  – it doesn’t last long.
My husband Randall Montgomery who takes all the lovely photos in my book
Cotswolds Memoir
 (on Amazon) and on my web site makes just one pie a year – and he
waits for the Cotswolds cherries which are particularly juicy and flavourful.
Here’s the recipe for this delicious cherry pie.

Ingredients:

2 Pre-made Shortcrust Pastry Shells
2 lbs Freshly picked cherries (Cotswolds Cherries if possible)
2 tbls Brown Sugar
1 Egg-white beaten with a tsp of water

Method:

Pre-heat oven to 300 degrees F (150 C or gas mark 2)
Pit the Cherries, place in a saucepan sprinkle with Brown Sugar, stir,
cover and stew on low heat for 20 minutes stirring occasionally
While the cherry mixture is cooking,  roll out one Shortcrust Pastry Shell and place in 9″ pie pan
Prick the bottom of the shell with a fork and Bake for 20 Minutes

While the bottom shell is baking roll out the second Shortcrust Pastry to the thickness of a 10p coin and
with a pizza wheel or sharp knife cut the Pastry in 3/4″ strips 10″-12″ long

After baking, remove the first crust from the oven and use a slotted spoon to spoon the cherries into it
reserving the excess juice to use later (possibly as an ice cream topping)
(for decoration reserve one particularly large cherry to place on the top of the pie)
Now brush the egg mixture around the edge of the bottom crust and
use the strips of the second rolled out pastry to form a lattice work top as per this video below:

HOW TO WEAVE LATTICE PASTRY

Brush on more of the egg mixture, coating the top of the pie and sprinkle with Brown Sugar
Place in the oven and bake for an additional 30-40 minutes or until the pastry is golden brown

Life is Just a Bowl of Cherries

by Ray Henderson and lyrics by Buddy G. DeSylva and Lew Brown, published in 1931.
Rudy Vallee‘s version, recorded it in 1931, stayed five weeks in the top 10 pop music charts.
Life is just a bowl of cherries
Don’t take it serious,
Life’s too mysterious
You work,
You save,
You worry so
But you can’t take your dough
When you go, go, go
So keep repeating “It’s the berries.”
The strongest oak must fall
The sweet things in life
To you were just loaned
So how can you lose
What you’ve never owned
Life is just a bowl of cherries
So live and laugh, aha!
Laugh and love
Live and laugh,
Laugh and love,
Live and laugh at it all!

Cotswolds Memoir_DizWhite

New! Cotswolds Memoir is now available as an AudioBook in addition to Paperback and Kindle

Click below to order
a.com_logo_RGB  

 

 amazon
A portion of the proceeds of every copy of  COTSWOLDS MEMOIR: is donated to Cotswold conservation institutions.

Cotswolds Memoir Excerpt Celebrating Laurie Lee’s Centenary Year

Laurie-Lee-007

Laurie Lee

Laurie Lee, author of Cider With Rosie, widely thought to be England’s greatest pastoral writer, was born 100 years ago this coming June.

Below is an except from Diz White’s travel/humour book Cotswolds Memoir which describes her meeting Laurie’s widow Katherine and his daughter Jessy as she explored Laurie’s birthplace in Slad.

NEW! Just Released: AUDIO BOOK of Cotswolds Memoir  Discovering a Beautiful Region of Britain on a Quest to Buy a 17th Century Cottage. (Available on Amazon and iTunes)

See Press Release of newly released Audio Book of Cotswolds Memoir below.

EXCERPT ABOUT LAURIE LEE FROM COTSWOLDS MEMOIR

To buck ourselves up we set off early the next morning for a walk that I had wanted to take since reading the charming book Cider With Rosie, which was written by one of England’s greatest pastoral writers, Laurie Lee. This author is not that well known in the US but in England his books are now required reading in many schools. Cider With Rosie, in which Laurie Lee describes his childhood and coming of age, is one of my favourite books and is set where the author was raised, in the village of Slad, just a couple of miles north of Stroud. The Woolpack (Laurie Lee’s local pub), the cottage in which he lived as a child and the village school he attended are all situated along the main street, which is little more than a country lane.

The surrounding Slad Valley has such steep terrain that modern farming machinery cannot be used there and all the farming is still done in the traditional manner. This has made the village, set in this isolated valley, feel like the land that time forgot. As we drove through it we glimpsed the incredible views from Swift’s Hill, which we were glad to see were included in our walk.

When we reached Slad we naturally stopped first at the Woolpack, a two-storey stone inn dating from the sixteenth century, whose name acknowledges the tremendous wealth generated by the wool merchants through the centuries. Nowadays, however, it is associated mostly with Laurie Lee. His curious readers often visit to see the seat that was always saved by the publican solely for Laurie. This is next to his signed portrait and a pile of his books for sale.

The Woolpack pub, Slad

The Woolpack Pub, Slad

While Randy got our drinks, I hunted through this stack for a book that I had been unable to find anywhere else. It was entitled Two Women and primarily featured photographs that Laurie Lee had taken of his wife and daughter. This book wasn’t included in the pile of books and the publican didn’t have a copy of it, but promised to produce it by the time we’d finished our walk.

Several of the locals heard this exchange and as we drank our pint of beer they told us stories about this famous author. One old boy talked about the time, several years earlier, when a school bus came by and stopped right by Laurie Lee, who was sitting outside the Woolpack, basking in the sun. A school kid leaned out of the bus window.

‘Does anyone know where Laurie Lee is buried?’ he asked.

Laurie replied, ‘Well, he’s usually buried right here in the pub.’

When he finally died a few years later, he was laid to rest, at his request, in the churchyard opposite. He wanted to be positioned to have a good view of the pub and he got his wish.

Grave

The view from Laurie Lee’s Grave

We left the old boys laughing over their recollections and set off on our walk. We strolled downhill from the pub until we found a footpath to Slad Brook in the bottom of the valley, then set off for the hillside, passing the Elliot Nature Reserve on the way, and followed the path to Swift’s Hill high above us. It was a steep climb with only one place to rest before the top. But, once we got there, what a view! It was a sparklingly sunny day and we immediately forgot the exertion of our climb as we looked around. The steep slopes of the Slad Valley and the rolling hills beyond were dotted with sheep and cattle. In the distance we spotted the tiny hamlet of Elcombe nestled in the hillside, its stone cottages framed by the valley’s slopes. We stood on the top of the hill for a long time in the sun and the breeze as we drank in the spectacular views, feeling as though we were on top of the world.

Finally, we descended down Knapp Lane, through Elcombe, past signs to Furness Farm and took a lane that turned sharply to the right. This led us to a track that took us downhill through Redding Wood and into the Slad Valley. The cool dark mustiness of Redding Wood after the bright windy hilltop was a wonderful contrast and we really enjoyed its mysterious, gloomy atmosphere. It was like something from a Tolkien novel. We continued through the trees, downhill past Slad Brook until the track joined Steanbridge Lane and returned us to the Woolpack.

Our walk had taken us on a journey of over two strenuous miles and so we were very hungry for lunch. This was our lucky day – a Sunday actually – because a whole lamb was being barbecued in the pub garden and served for the traditional Sunday lunch, which is always more of a feast in England than any other meal. The scent of the lamb, slathered in garlic and rosemary, wafted up to us from the garden and drove us into a lyrical homage to all sheep everywhere. When it was served it tasted like ‘heaven on a stick’ – my highest compliment. It came with all the trimmings, including mint sauce, a sage dressing, cauliflower cheese, and, of course, roast potatoes.

After lunch the publican beckoned to us from behind the bar. He smiled and said our book would be arriving soon. A short while later, as we finished our coffee, two women walked into the pub and I was thrilled when the publican introduced us to Laurie Lee’s widow Katherine and his daughter Jessy. They had brought Laurie’s book Two Women with them.

I purchased the book and, after signing it, they sat chatting with us for quite a while. When it was time to leave, Katherine told us exactly where to look for the cottage that Laurie Lee had lived in as a child and after we said goodbye we wandered along the main street until we found it set below the road down an embankment nearby. It was fascinating to see the actual setting of Laurie’s book and imagine him living there as a small boy.

Rosebank

Rosebank Cottage

As we left the beautiful Slad Valley we decided that our visit there had been one of the highlights of the summer. If the reader hasn’t already come across Cider with Rosie, I highly recommend it.

 

Cotswolds Memoir Cover-2

For Immediate Release

NEW! Audio Book

of

COTSWOLDS MEMOIR

Discovering a Beautiful Region of Britain

on a Quest to Buy a 17th Century Cottage

by Diz White

                    Narrated by the Author/Actress – performing 70 Characters

 Amazon ASIN number: B00K5KD7NW 
Co-Produced & Directed by EMMY AWARD WINNER Marsha Goodman

“Diz White writes about the Cotswolds with such passion. Superb story telling.”

Debbie McGeeBBC

“Extremely entertaining, funny and beautifully written”

Katie Jarvis, Cotswold Life Magazine

The ultimate laugh-out-loud, good life, house-hunting, foodie, travel-tour, meet the eccentric locals, roller-coaster cliff hanger, fun memoir. A love note to the Cotswolds, one of the most beautiful regions of England.

The story began when Award-winning comedy actress Diz White found herself craving Yorkshire Pudding at every meal, knowing that her roots were pulling her back from the glitz and glamour of Hollywood to her homeland in the UK. After a holiday in the Cotswolds, with her husband, Diz was sold and the hunt was on to find her dream country cottage.

However, the search wasn’t just about finding the perfect house; it was about discovering the Cotswolds region and meeting some wonderfully eccentric country characters along the way. During her quest, Diz visited Roman settlements, Domesday Churches, archeology digs, and enjoyed river rambles, garden tours and pub hikes.

This memoir explores her journey, through a combination of laugh-out-loud moments and cliff-hanging twists, to the satisfaction of a hard won prize. Not only is Cotswolds Memoir a wonderful story, it’s also a valuable insight into some of the best ‘off-the-beaten-track’ sites and features hints and tips for buying a Cotswold cottage. Photos by Randall Montgomery

● Does for the Cotswolds what Under the Tuscan Sun did for Italy

● Doubles as an informative travel-tour of the Cotswolds

● Valuable Visitor’s Guide Included

● Laugh-out-loud Bill Bryson (Notes from a Small Island)-style humour

● Donation to Cotswolds Conservation Organizations from book’s proceeds

British-born Diz White divides her time between an acting and writing career in Hollywood – credits include Voice – How to Train Your Dragon, Titanic, Friends, Boston Legal and many more On camera: Star Trek Next Generation, Bullshot (HandMade Films) – and the Cotswolds – her passion. She wrote Haunted Cotswolds (The History Press), Haunted Cheltenham (The History Press) and produced with her husband GHOSTS OF GREAT BRITAIN COLLECTION – Haunted Cotswolds DVD (Available on Amazon).

Cotswolds Memoir (All versions) published by Larrabee Libraries, Div.of Larrabee Industries Inc.

Audio Book: Amazon ASIN number: B00K5KD7NW

Also a Paperback Original ISBN 978-0-9571162-0-7 & Kindle ISBN 978-0-9571162-1-4

To listen to a sample of the Audio Book of Cotswolds Memoir go to Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk

To review this book or request an interview, Contact: Katie PublicityPromo@aol.com

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COTSWOLDS MEMOIR Author’s video of COTSWOLD WILDLIFE PARK

A great day out with or without kids. There are animals galore, giraffes meerkats, penguins, lions, camels, reindeer and many more. A lovely restaurant (open all day) with indoor/outdoor seating means visitors can take a break while spending all day with the animals. There are scenic gardens and so much of interest. See their website for all kinds of ideas for adults and kids – like being a keeper for a day or the interactive zone. Information about conservation, education and more. There’s a gift shop and a train – the list goes on. The Cotswold Wildlife Park is situated in the lush grounds of an ancient manor house on the Bradwell Grove Estate. Owner John Heyworth has given this estate over to the zoological collection. This setting could not be more beautiful, a long drive from the park gates leads through to a great country estate and right into the animal collection. The park is framed by enormous old oak trees that surround the six hundred year old manor house. California redwoods and giant yew trees loom majestically over visitors and add even more to the many delights of this special place to visit.

Video created by Randall Montgomery

Cotswold Wildlife Park is located 2 miles south of the medieval town of Burford, Oxfordshire, on the A361

SatNav Postcode for Cotswolds Wildlife Park OX18 4JP

http://www.cotswoldwildlifepark.co.uk

by Diz White author of

COTSWOLDS MEMOIR:

Discovering a Beautiful Region of Britain on a Quest to Buy a 17thCentury CottageCotswolds Memoir Cover-2

A portion of the proceeds of every copy of  COTSWOLDS MEMOIR: is donated to Cotswold conservation institutions. Available on
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Cotswolds Memoir Book Signing and Talk with Slide Presentation and Video Clips at Distant Lands Bookstore

Cotswolds Memoir_DizWhite

Logo

20 S. Raymond Ave. Pasadena, CA

Monday, April 7th @ 7:30 P.M.

RSVP to 626 449 3220

British-born writer and comedy actress Diz White describes how she came to write her travel-humor book COTSWOLDS MEMOIR: Discovering a Beautiful Region of Britain on a Quest to Buy a 17th Century Cottage. Amusing anecdotes about her roller-coaster search for a cottage, as she scrambled between Hollywood and Gloucestershire, are interwoven with a slide show of gorgeous pictures of this scenic region and video clips of little known historic treasures of off-the-beaten-track Cotswolds

 

WILD about the Cotswolds? 10 WILD Cotswold Ideas to EAT, STAY, ENJOY

Kiftsgate2
  • The WILD Rabbit Country Pub and Rooms
  • WILD Thyme Inn and rooms
  • The WILD Duck Inn
  • WILD Air Bed and Breakfast
  • WILD Garlic Restaurant and Rooms
  • WILD Camping at the Tunnel House Inn
  • WILD Rock Climbing
  • WILD Swimming
  • WILDLife Trust
  • Cotswold WILDLife Park and Gardens
“Where do you recommend we go when we get there?” is a frequent question and this gave me the idea of putting together ‘I’m just WILD about the Cotswolds list of great places to eat, stay and enjoy in this lovely region together with descriptions and contact info.

WILD about the #Cotswolds? 10 WILD Cotswold Ideas to EAT, STAY, ENJOY

WildRabbit-guestroom

The WILD Rabbit near Stow-on-the-Wold in the charming and tranquil village of Kingham

The Cotswold stone building that houses The Wild Rabbit dates from 1750. After a thorough and very tastefully done renovation, The Wild Rabbit opened in September of last year.

Typical Sunday lunch menu includes starters such as potted rabbit, pickled vegetable salad and crab and scallop cannelloni and crab bisque.

Mains might include: roast rump of beef, poached tongue, bone marrow, and all the trimmings or skate wing, braised celery with beurre noisette

All the bedrooms are individually decorated and named after woodland animals. There are twelve in all,  four of which are garden rooms and dog-friendly.

theteam@thewildrabbit.co.uk

The Wild Rabbit, Church Street, Kingham, Oxfordshire OX7 6YA

01608 658 389

www.thewildrabbit.co.uk

Wild Thyme

WILD Thyme Inn and Rooms in Chipping Norton

Ideal if you want to indulge in the restaurant and simply stagger up to bed, or if you are looking for a base to explore the Cotswolds – three stylish rooms are located within this charming 400 year old, Grade 2 listed building.
The rooms are double bedded and en-suite with all the usual facilities. Breakfast is a substantial continental, served in the restaurant, or in your room.
Nick and Sally own and personally manage Wild Thyme Restaurant with Rooms and there is space for 35 diners. It is possible to hire the whole restaurant for exclusive use, or The Garden Room, which seats up to 14 people, for a smaller celebration.
Many original features have been retained within the Cotswold stone walls and a wonderful window seat blends perfectly with more contemporary elements to create a stylish decor.
A typical starter might include: Oven baked buckwheat blinis, Upton smoked salmon, lemon prawns and hollandaise.
Pan fried filet of Cornish mackerel, parmesan, parsnip puree, sauté girolles and crispy pancetta.
A main course might include: Barrington Estate partridge; roasted breast, ragout ravioli, savoy cabbage, roasted celeriac, girolles, crispy pancetta, Madera cream, game jus or
Pan roasted Cornish brill, Brixham mussels, truffle mash, baby spinach, parsley root and chives

The WILD Thyme Restaurant and Rooms, 10 New Street, Chipping Norton
Oxfordshire
OX7 5LJ
enquiries@wildthymerestaurant.co.uk
+44 (0) 1608 645060
www.wildthymerestaurant.co.uk

the-wild-duck-inn-gv

The WILD Duck Inn   Ewen near Cirencester

This charming twelve bedroom 16th Century Inn is situated near the River Thames in the tranquil Cotswold village of Ewen near Cirencester.

Featuring old beams and portraits, the warm dining room at The Wild Duck serves a modern European and British menu. The chefs use local, organic produce, including some meats from the Prince Charles’ Highgrove Estate. The Post Horn Bar serves traditional ales and wine.

Surrounded by the Cotswold Water Park, The Wild Duck Inn is close to 80 different lakes. Local activities include fishing, jet-skiing and sailing, and Cirencester is just 3 miles away

Some of the individually designed rooms have a stylish 4-poster bed, and all have tea/coffee facilities. The Grouse Room lounge has a cozy fireplace, and there is free Wi-Fi in the public areas. The Wild Duck Inn offers elegant rooms with flat-screen TVs and DVD players. There is a garden terrace for open air dining.

Click here for booking with Trip Advisor

wild-air-bed-breakfast

WILD Air Bed and Breakfast

This delightful but affordable high-end Bed and Breakfast, more like a luxurious hotel actually, is close to Minchinhampton and Nailsworth. There is also accommodation available in a separate apartment. There are all the mod cons, fluffy towels and so on and a full English breakfast, locally sourced, is served either in the garden room or on the terrace.

Brendan and Kay Clements
Wild Air
Church End, Hampton Green, Nr Box, Stroud, Gloucestershire GL6 9AD
01453 887376
07966 031580
stay@wildaircotswolds.co.uk

www.wildaircotswolds.co.uk

wild garlic

The WILD Garlic Restaurant and Rooms

All the food is made on the premises from fresh pasta and ice cream to the daily baked organic bread. Situated above the restaurant are three Four Star AA awarded spacious rooms available for Bed and Breakfast accommodation.

Wild Garlic Restaurant and Rooms 3 Cossacks Square, Nailsworth, Glos GL6 0DB

Tel: 01453 832 615

www.wild-garlic.co.uk

tunnell_house_inn

WILD Camping in the grounds of Tunnel House Inn

Near Cirencester Gloucestershire

Wild camping available all year round for tents in the stunningly beautiful grounds of the Tunnel House Inn which are on the edge of Hailey Wood.

The unique 17th Century Tunnel House Inn is set in an idyllic rural location nestled between the Cotswold villages of Coates and Tarlton It is close to the River Thames and sits between the Thames and the Severn Canal. The relaxed and welcoming bar has a unique character as it is furnished with a vast collection of memorabilia.

Good food served all day

01285 770280 info@tunnelhouse.com

far peak

WILD Rock Climbing in the Cotswolds

Email: info@farpeak.co.uk

Telephone: 01285 721090

The facility at Far Peak has ample free parking and camping facilities. Great for families. No shop or playground but plenty of free space for ball games and for children to explore.

There is a public house within walking distance across the fields and local amenities are available in the nearby Cotswold town of Northleach.

There are miles of wonderful walks to be enjoyed in the area and lots of villages and lanes to be explored by walkers and cyclists.

Farpeak Climbing Centre (formally Wildrock)

Far Peak, Northleach, Gloucestershire, GL54 3JL

Email: info@farpeak.co.uk

farpeakclimbing.co.uk

wild swimming

WILD Swimming in the Cotswolds

Discover the best wild swim locations in Oxfordshire and the Cotswolds, whether a river swim, a lake or even a waterfall.

Find local news and events in your area, water campaigns that might interest you or join a group or a meeting of like-minded people.

Includes Cotswold wild swimming locations in the Windrush River, Near Lechlade etc.,

www.wildswimming.co.uk

wildlife trust

Wildlife Trust

Their web site has a ‘Great places to see’ section to plan a wonderful day out in the Cotswolds.

Find out about nature reserves, webcams, local wildlife sites, family Welly walks, nest box making, how to contribute to the preservation of wildlife and lots more.

www.Wildlifetrust.org

 cotswold-wildlife-park

Cotswold WILDLife Park and Gardens

A great day out with or without kids. A lovely restaurant with indoor/outdoor seating means you can take a break while spending all day with the animals. Scenic, gardens with so much of interest. See their website for all kinds of ideas for adults and kids  – like being a keeper for a day. Information about conservation, education and so much more. There’s a gift shop and a train – the list goes on.

Cotswold Wildlife Park is located 2 miles south of the medieval town of Burford, Oxfordshire, on the A361

SatNav Postcode for Cotswolds Wildlife Park OX18 4JP Look out for Bradwell Grove

www.cotswoldwildlifepark.co.uk

by Diz White author of

COTSWOLDS MEMOIR:

Discovering a Beautiful Region of Britain on a Quest to Buy a 17thCentury Cottage. Cotswolds Memoir Cover-2

A portion of the proceeds of every copy of  COTSWOLDS MEMOIR: is donated to Cotswold conservation institutions. Available on

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Downton Abbey’s Portrayal of Debutante Presentation at Court by the author of Cotswolds Memoir

Presentation 2

 Lady Grantham (Elizabeth McGovern) and Lady Rose (Lily James)

Downton Abbey paints a fascinating picture of a royal presentation at court in Episode 4 of the series. The purpose of this event was for the upper class debutantes and eligible bachelors to meet and make suitable marriages.

Royals

                King George V and Queen Mary        King George V  (Guy Williams) & Queen Mary (uncredited) 

In Downton Abbey Lady Rose is presented to George V and Queen Mary. A very deep curtsey was required by a debutante as the presentation is made. Debutantes were advised to practice their curtsey and many were nervous about getting it right. Various disasters were reported with Debutantes either tumbling over or being unable to rise after the curtsey without the aid of a hastily summoned courtier.

Presentation

Lady Rose being presented at court

At the presentation a debutante would be announced to the King and Queen and after a curtsey would make her exit, stepping away from the Royals without turning around, in order not show her back.

A court presentation signaled the beginning of the social season in Britain and Debutantes were required to have a sponsor. It was mandatory that this sponsor be someone who had already been presented to the King and Queen.

Linnie Irwin Sweeney, left, and Elsie Irwin Sweeney in 1923.

Linnie Irwin Sweeney, left, and her daughter Elsie Irwin Sweeney being presented at court in 1923

Court dress followed prescribed tradition, with most girls wearing white evening dresses, although pastel shades where also in order. Three ostrich feathers attached to a veil adorned the debutante’s hair and pearls and jewelry borrowed from family heirlooms were traditionally worn.

Debutantes were chaperoned at dances by any female member of the family who could be induced to volunteer. Many a great-aunt would fall asleep in the small gilt chairs that were provided at these formal balls while the Debutante in her charge would often secretly slip away unnoticed to a nightclub. To many a young girl this would be a far more exciting prospect than a society ball.

George V portrait

King George V

A Sovereign presentation was designed to show off a Debutante as she entered society for the first time and to keep her selection of a husband confined to an elite, upper class circle. There was a lot of pressure on Debutantes to find their future husband at the various balls and entertainments during the first season of her presentation. But sometimes this was not possible and a second or even third season was needed to accomplish this goal.

In addition to the balls there were many other chances for Debutantes to meet a suitable prospective husband such as polo matches, Royal Ascot, tea parties, Thé Dansant and a Debutant’s own coming out party. This festivity was sometimes shared with a sister or cousin to defray expenses.

Presentation 3

Court presentations were removed from the court calendar in 1958 by Queen Elizabeth II,  and attempts by society to continue them without royal patronage were unsuccessful.

This little bit of history portrayed so charmingly in these scenes in Downton Abbey are all the more interesting because, as mentioned, the ritual of court presentation is now no more.

by Diz White author of

COTSWOLDS MEMOIR:

Discovering a Beautiful Region of Britain on a Quest to Buy a 17thCentury Cottage. Cotswolds Memoir Cover-2

A portion of the proceeds of every copy of  COTSWOLDS MEMOIR: is donated to Cotswold conservation institutions. Available on

a.com_logo_RGB     
amazon